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Nestlé Commits to Cage-Free Eggs by 2020

Nestlé Commits to Cage-Free Eggs by 2020



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Nestlé, the world’s largest food company by revenue, will be completely cage-free in the United States in the next four years

Other U.S. companies, like Kellogg’s and McDonald’s, have already begun to transition toward a cage-free egg supply chain.

Multinational food and beverage giant Nestlé is the latest company to join the commitment to using cage-free eggs in the United States, with a self-established deadline of 2020. Nestlé’s brands include Carnation, Purina, Coffee-Mate, DiGiorno, Dreyer’s, Gerber, Häagen-Dazs, Hot Pockets, Lean Cuisine, Toll House, and Nespresso, among others.

As the largest food company in the world by revenue, Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs per year in its products. As of now, none of its products use cage-free eggs, Pauk Bakus, Nestlé’s president of U.S. corporate affairs told Reuters in an interview.

Like other industry leaders, the company has faced increasing pressure from animal welfare organizations like the Humane Society to make a transition to cage-free eggs, a pledge already made by McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Panera, and the Kellogg Company.

In a statement, Matthew Prescott, senior food policy director of the Humane Society of the United States, praised the company’s decision. “When the world's largest food company speaks, their suppliers listen,” Prescott said. “In the short term, any egg producer would have to be out of their right mind to build a facility with cages.”

Prescott also said that he hoped Nestlé would extend the commitment to its international supply chain, a task that is harder to accomplish as global markets have separate supply chains for which the same timeline would be more difficult to follow.


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


All of Nestlé’s US eggs to be cage-free by 2020

Nestlé will transition to using only cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. food products within the next five years, the company announced on December 22. The company had earlier announced that it would phase out eggs from caged hens, but at the time had not yet committed to a date when the transition would be completed.

Nestlé uses approximately 20 million pounds of eggs annually to help create some of America’s most known food brands, including Häagen-Dazs, Dreyer’s and Edy’s ice creams, Nestlé Toll House cookie dough and Buitoni pasta. Eggs are also an important part of Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s popular breakfast items.

“Our products are in the fridges and pantries of socially-conscious consumers across the United States, and we share their belief in the importance of responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Paul Grimwood, chairman and CEO of Nestlé USA. “The move to using exclusively cage-free eggs is one more way that we’re responding to consumers and establishing a precedent for farm animal welfare.”


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