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How to Make Sriracha at Home Slideshow

How to Make Sriracha at Home Slideshow



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The Daily Meal: For someone who wants to make their own Sriracha at home, what ingredients would they need to buy?

Jojo Collins: Sriracha consists of chile peppers, vinegar, garlic, salt, and sugar.

Ingredients

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The Daily Meal: For someone who wants to make their own Sriracha at home, what ingredients would they need to buy?

Jojo Collins: Sriracha consists of chile peppers, vinegar, garlic, salt, and sugar.

The Key Ingredient

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TDM: In your opinion, which ingredient is key to making something close to "the real thing"?

JC: If you want a Sriracha that is close to "the real thing," start with red jalapeños, red fresnos, or long Holland peppers.

Proportions

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TDM: Can you provide some rough proportions for the main ingredients — for example, chile to sugar to salt to vinegar?

JC: You can really experiment here to come up with something that suits your fancy. If you are going to lacto-ferment your chiles, just make sure you have at least 2 percent salt (this will keep your peppers safe until the good bacteria take over). Two percent is about 3 tablespoons per 5 pounds of chile peppers.

Flavor Profiles

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TDM: For people looking to give their Sriracha a bit of personality, what kinds of chile peppers can they use to emphasize different flavor profiles — for example, hot, citrusy, or floral?

JC: Peppers have an attitude all their own so this is really going to depend on the varietal, region, and time of season. My advice is to get to know your farmers. Ask then what they grow and what the peppers taste like — then pull up your bootstraps and try them raw, even just a little nibble at a time, to see what flavor they are all about.

Dried Versus Fresh

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TDM: Should people be using dried or fresh chile peppers, and should they be seeded?

JC: I haven't played around with dried chile peppers, but I do know others that have. Some people are scared of the seeds because that's where the heat is, but I leave the whole chile pepper in my mix. Also, you'll need a decent blender if you want to keep the seeds in (see next question).

Texture and Consistency

TDM: How do you achieve the correct consistency?

JC: This was actually one of the hurdles I came across in scaling up my production. I ended up doing a crowd-funding campaign… to raise money for an industrial blender that could handle puréeing whole chile peppers. Now I use a 4-horsepower blender.

Allergic to Horses

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TDM: But, what if you don't have a horse-powered blender?

JC: If you don't have a really strong blender like a Vitamix, plan on either wearing your home version out or experimenting with seeding your peppers.

Last Words

Finally, we asked Collins for her last parting words of advice.

"Have fun and get into it," says Collins. "Learn where your food comes from and invest in knowing what you put into your body. Experiment, play, get creative. May your kitchen become your temple..."

Click here to see the Power Ketchup Recipe.


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because:


Homemade Sriracha – How to Make Thai Sriracha ซ้อสศรีราชา


In continuing our Stock Your Thai Pantry series, one item that must be mentioned is Sriracha sauce (ซ้อสศรีราชา) — the all-purpose hot sauce that, according to the most prominent yet unsubstantiated theory, originated from a city after which it was named. I can’t think of any hot sauce that is more widely used and versatile when it comes to the modern Thai cuisine. Even though Sriracha has become a generic name for similar hot sauces made both domestically and outside of Thailand, the Thai palates don’t have a hard time recognizing the authentic spicy, sweet, tangy, garlicky sauce that we grew up with.

Folks seem a bit touchy when the subject of Sriracha (what’s authentic and what’s not, whether the name should be used to call non-Thai products, etc.) is brought up. So I will try my best to write this post in the most just-the-fact-ma’am way as I possibly can.

It has been suggested that Sriracha sauce is a sauce made according to a tradition begun in and around the city of Si Racha(อำเภอศรีราชา), a Thai eastern province of Chonburi(จังหวัดชลบุรี) — hence the name. But this has yet to be substantiated. Regardless, what we do know is that it is a sauce that originated from and has been heavily used in Thailand.

The sauce is traditionally made of fresh larger red peppers or พริกชี้ฟ้า (never dried peppers and usually not small bird’s eye ones or พริกขี้หนู), vinegar (white only — never rice or cider vinegar), garlic, sugar, and salt. It should also be noted that Sriracha sauce never contains tomatoes. 1 Additionally, Sriracha always has smooth texture it’s never chunky. When you look at it, you should not see pepper seeds or chunks of pepper skin. The sauce, as we know it in Thailand, does not have the texture of sambal — a sauce which, though delicious, should not be confused with Sriracha.

Thai Sriracha, according to my observation, is runnier and sweeter than the US-made Sriracha. The flavor lends itself very well to Thai dishes, especially those that can sometimes be a bit on the greasy side. (The heat and the tang help restore the balance.) I drizzle it on Thai omelet, turn it into a dipping sauce or a dipping sauce base, make a stir-fry sauce or marinade out of it, and use it as a barbecue sauce.

There are many other ways to use Thai Sriracha which I will mention here in future posts.

Strain, but don’t overdo it let some of the fine pulp go through the mesh to give the sauce body.
As an aside, to clear up the issue once and for all,the correct pronunciation of Sriracha, as recognized by literate native speakers of the Thai language , is see-rah-chah. 2

Why make your own Sriracha? After all — not that I’ve ever conducted a nationwide poll — most Thai people don’t make their own Sriracha in much the same way as how Americans don’t normally make their own ketchup. But I, personally 3 , make my own Sriracha, because: